RV Roof Replacement Using Line-X on a Weekend Warrior Fifth Wheel

rv-roof-replacement-1Ever wonder what it would look like when you tear off the roof of a RV? Hopefully you never have to know. If you do it means you probably had water damage, possible damage from falling tree limbs, or other maintenance concerns. RV roof replacement can be one of the most daunting projects to undertake, especially considering the level of labor and cost. It is more common that we would like to admit given that most RV roofs are not designed with longevity in mind. Water will find its way in eventually. Some times it doesn’t even matter how diligent you are with your maintenance schedule.

Line-X RV Roof Replacement

Most RV owners choose to seal or partially repair their RV roof and avoid replacing it at all costs. A RV’er who goes by onearmyrider at the RV.net forums decided to go all in and tear off the roof of his 2006 37′ Weekend Warrior 5th Wheel and a do a full RV roof replacement after discovering significant water and rot damage. After the grueling process of tearing off the roof, he moved on to removing all the low quality insulation. Not surprisingly, only around 50% of the roof was insulated. We assume the factory never expected an owner to tear of the roof to see the poor insulation.

Then the RV roof replacement got interesting. Once down to the bare minimum, both spray and traditional insulation was installed where needed. Then, plywood was installed over top of the roof structure which added most of the additional weight (total weight of the repair increased the RV 380lbs). Lastly, in an interesting twist, Line-X (yes, the truck bed liner) was used to coat the roof as opposed to the typical rubber roof material. Though unconventional the premise is a good one. Line-X is a rugged weather resistant material that seals permanently locking out dust, dirt, and most importantly water.

The cost for a more traditional rubber roof does vary, but in this case it would have ran more than $5,000. The Line-X coating, which ran from the back of the fifth wheel all the way to front end and over the front, only cost $4,000. Perhaps you could save even more if you used a DIY bed liner kit. When you consider the cost of the typical 2006 fifth wheel, you can see why most folks decide not to do RV roof replacement as it is cost prohibitive. But, in this case, the roof should last for many years without any problems as long as the vents/AC unit are properly sealed and maintained.

Have you done a RV roof replacement? Would you consider Line-X as an option? Please share in the comments below.

Comments

  1. Stuart Manary says

    I have a 1979Pace Arrow that I have to replace the entire roof, inside and out. Any suggestions would be helpful. I got a great deal on this rig, so I can afford to put some time and money into it. I am a carpenter by trade, so the physical aspect is not worrying me.. Thanks

  2. Marianna says

    Just a bit of experience with LineX. We used it on two outdoor roof decks 14 years ago. One of the decks that is completely exposed to the elements has cracked and leaked and has been re coated now with another product. Our house painter said that using a good porch paint over the LineX would have prevented this from occurring. The second deck, still in perfect condition, has recently received a coat of paint (it adheres well) and expect it should last for many years.

  3. Ruth says

    We did a new roof over Thanksgiving 2013. Wow what a project. We looked into getting it “Rhinoed” or “Linexed” and it was cost prohibitive for us. We replaced a couple small pieces of the wood, then put an entire new second layer of wood before putting an entire new membrane. We luckily were able to do this project indoors (Hubbs workplace) and with access to anything you could possibly need. Including a forklift to haul all the wood up to the roof. This was a job I would not recommend to DIY’ers unless you are willing to do some MAJOR work. This job took a full 4 1/2 days and a ton of physical labor. Came out great, and saved us a bunch of money. We put about $1300 into this, whereas the dealership told us it would be about $7K! We bought this used rig knowing we would need to reroof it, and therefore we got a great deal on it. That’s the biggest job this rig needs, but we do have a few more projects. Good luck to us. : )

Add Comment Register



Your Thoughts:

*Email Address will not be published.